Degrees of The University of Oxford

Degrees Of The University Of Oxford

The system of academic degrees in the University of Oxford can be confusing to those not familiar with it. This is not merely because many degree titles date from the Middle Ages, but also because many changes have been haphazardly introduced in recent years. For example, the (medieval) BD, BM, BCL, etc., are postgraduate degrees, while the (modern) MPhys, MEng, etc., are undergraduate degrees.

In postnominals, "University of Oxford" is normally abbreviated "Oxon.", which is short for (Academia) Oxoniensis: e.g. MA (Oxon.), although within the university itself the abbreviation "Oxf" can be used.

Read more about Degrees Of The University Of Oxford:  Undergraduate Degrees, The Degree of Master of Arts, Order of Academic Standing

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Degrees Of The University Of Oxford - Order of Academic Standing
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