Degrees of The University of Oxford

Degrees Of The University Of Oxford

The system of academic degrees in the University of Oxford can be confusing to those not familiar with it. This is not merely because many degree titles date from the Middle Ages, but also because many changes have been haphazardly introduced in recent years. For example, the (medieval) BD, BM, BCL, etc., are postgraduate degrees, while the (modern) MPhys, MEng, etc., are undergraduate degrees.

In postnominals, "University of Oxford" is normally abbreviated "Oxon.", which is short for (Academia) Oxoniensis: e.g. MA (Oxon.), although within the university itself the abbreviation "Oxf" can be used.

Read more about Degrees Of The University Of Oxford:  Undergraduate Degrees, The Degree of Master of Arts, Order of Academic Standing

Other articles related to "degrees of the university of oxford, of the university of oxford, degree":

Degrees Of The University Of Oxford - Order of Academic Standing
... Members of the University of Oxford are ranked according to their degree ... of Theology Bachelor of Education Within each degree the holders are ranked by the date on which they proceeded to their degree ... If the Degree of Master of Biochemistry or Chemistry or Computer Science or Earth Sciences or Engineering or Mathematics or Mathematics and Computer Science or ...

Famous quotes containing the words degrees of, oxford, degrees and/or university:

    Gradually we come to admit that Shakespeare understands a greater extent and variety of human life than Dante; but that Dante understands deeper degrees of degradation and higher degrees of exaltation.
    —T.S. (Thomas Stearns)

    During the first formative centuries of its existence, Christianity was separated from and indeed antagonistic to the state, with which it only later became involved. From the lifetime of its founder, Islam was the state, and the identity of religion and government is indelibly stamped on the memories and awareness of the faithful from their own sacred writings, history, and experience.
    Bernard Lewis, U.S. Middle Eastern specialist. Islam and the West, ch. 8, Oxford University Press (1993)

    By degrees we may come to know the primitive sense of the permanent objects of nature, so that the world shall be to us an open book, and every form significant of its hidden life and final cause.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)

    In the United States, it is now possible for a person eighteen years of age, female as well as male, to graduate from high school, college, or university without ever having cared for, or even held, a baby; without ever having comforted or assisted another human being who really needed help. . . . No society can long sustain itself unless its members have learned the sensitivities, motivations, and skills involved in assisting and caring for other human beings.
    Urie Bronfenbrenner (b. 1917)