Degrees of The University of Oxford

Degrees Of The University Of Oxford

The system of academic degrees in the University of Oxford can be confusing to those not familiar with it. This is not merely because many degree titles date from the Middle Ages, but also because many changes have been haphazardly introduced in recent years. For example, the (medieval) BD, BM, BCL, etc., are postgraduate degrees, while the (modern) MPhys, MEng, etc., are undergraduate degrees.

In postnominals, "University of Oxford" is normally abbreviated "Oxon.", which is short for (Academia) Oxoniensis: e.g. MA (Oxon.), although within the university itself the abbreviation "Oxf" can be used.

Read more about Degrees Of The University Of Oxford:  Undergraduate Degrees, The Degree of Master of Arts, Order of Academic Standing

Other articles related to "degrees of the university of oxford, of the university of oxford, degree":

Degrees Of The University Of Oxford - Order of Academic Standing
... Members of the University of Oxford are ranked according to their degree ... of Fine Art Bachelor of Theology Bachelor of Education Within each degree the holders are ranked by the date on which they proceeded to their degree ... If the Degree of Master of Biochemistry or Chemistry or Computer Science or Earth Sciences or Engineering or Mathematics or Mathematics and Computer ...

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