Degrees of Freedom

Degrees of freedom can mean:

  • Degrees of freedom (mechanics), independent displacements and/or rotations that specify the orientation of the body or system
  • Degrees of freedom (physics and chemistry), a term used in explaining dependence on parameters, or the dimensions of a phase space
  • Degrees of freedom (statistics), the number of values in the final calculation of a statistic that are free to vary

Other articles related to "degrees of freedom":

Bicycle And Motorcycle Dynamics - Lateral Dynamics - Lateral Motion Theory - Degrees of Freedom
... The number of degrees of freedom of a bike depends on the particular model being used ... with knife edge wheels rolling on a flat smooth surface, has 7 degrees of freedom (configuration variables required to completely describe the location and ... of the wheels are ignored, the first five degrees of freedom can also be ignored, and the bike can be described by just two variables lean angle and steer angle ...
Mixed-design Analysis Of Variance - Degrees of Freedom
... In order to calculate the degrees of freedom for between-subjects effects, dfBS = R – 1, where R refers to the number of levels of between-subject groups ... In the case of the degrees of freedom for the between-subject effects error, dfBS(Error) = Nk – R, where Nk is equal to the number of participants, and ... To calculate the degrees of freedom for within-subject effects, dfWS = C – 1, where C is the number of within-subject tests ...

Famous quotes containing the words degrees of, freedom and/or degrees:

    Gradually we come to admit that Shakespeare understands a greater extent and variety of human life than Dante; but that Dante understands deeper degrees of degradation and higher degrees of exaltation.
    —T.S. (Thomas Stearns)

    Freedom is always and exclusively freedom for the one who thinks differently.
    Rosa Luxemburg (1870–1919)

    The political truths declared in that solemn manner acquire by degrees the character of fundamental maxims of free Government, and as they become incorporated with national sentiment, counteract the impulses of interest and passion.
    James Madison (1751–1836)