Degrees of Eastern Orthodox Monasticism

The degrees of Eastern Orthodox monasticism are the stages an Eastern Orthodox monk or nun passes through in their religious vocation.

In the Eastern Orthodox Church, the process of becoming a monk or nun (female ascetics in the East are called monks, nun is a Western tradition) is intentionally slow, as the monastic vows taken are considered to entail a lifelong commitment to God, and are not to be entered into lightly. After completing the novitiate, there are three degrees of or steps in conferring the monastic habit.

Read more about Degrees Of Eastern Orthodox Monasticism:  Orthodox Monasticism, Coptic Orthodox Monastic Degrees

Other articles related to "degrees of eastern orthodox monasticism, orthodox, degrees of, degree":

degrees" class="article_title_2">Degrees Of Eastern Orthodox Monasticism - Coptic Orthodox Monastic Degrees
... In the Coptic Orthodox Church of Alexandria there are only two degrees of professed monks, corresponding to the Rassaphore combined with the Stavrophore and the Great ... and it is usually granted when a monk has reached a high degree of asceticism or has been living as a hermit and also to the monks, hieromonks and ...

Famous quotes containing the words degrees of, monasticism, orthodox, eastern and/or degrees:

    So that the life of a writer, whatever he might fancy to the contrary, was not so much a state of composition, as a state of warfare; and his probation in it, precisely that of any other man militant upon earth,—both depending alike, not half so much upon the degrees of his WIT—as his RESISTANCE.
    Laurence Sterne (1713–1768)

    Christianity as an organized religion has not always had a harmonious relationship with the family. Unlike Judaism, it kept almost no rituals that took place in private homes. The esteem that monasticism and priestly celibacy enjoyed implied a denigration of marriage and parenthood.
    Beatrice Gottlieb, U.S. historian. The Family in the Western World from the Black Death to the Industrial Age, ch. 12, Oxford University Press (1993)

    All orthodox opinion—that is, today, “revolutionary” opinion either of the pure or the impure variety—is anti-man.
    Wyndham Lewis (1882–1957)

    My second husband was an American. We traveled all over the world and everywhere we went he would say to people, “I am an American. I am an American.” They finally shot him in one of those Eastern countries.
    John Paxton (1911–1985)

    The most durable thing in writing is style, and style is the most valuable investment a writer can make with his time. It pays off slowly, your agent will sneer at it, your publisher will misunderstand it, and it will take people you have never heard of to convince them by slow degrees that the writer who puts his individual mark on the way he writes will always pay off.
    Raymond Chandler (1888–1959)