Degrees of Eastern Orthodox Monasticism

The degrees of Eastern Orthodox monasticism are the stages an Eastern Orthodox monk or nun passes through in their religious vocation.

In the Eastern Orthodox Church, the process of becoming a monk or nun (female ascetics in the East are called monks, nun is a Western tradition) is intentionally slow, as the monastic vows taken are considered to entail a lifelong commitment to God, and are not to be entered into lightly. After completing the novitiate, there are three degrees of or steps in conferring the monastic habit.

Read more about Degrees Of Eastern Orthodox Monasticism:  Orthodox Monasticism, Coptic Orthodox Monastic Degrees

Other articles related to "degrees of eastern orthodox monasticism, orthodox, degrees of, degree":

degrees" class="article_title_2">Degrees Of Eastern Orthodox Monasticism - Coptic Orthodox Monastic Degrees
... In the Coptic Orthodox Church of Alexandria there are only two degrees of professed monks, corresponding to the Rassaphore combined with the Stavrophore and the ... consecration or shortly afterwards and it is usually granted when a monk has reached a high degree of asceticism or has been living as a hermit and also to the monks, hieromonks and abbots ...

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