Degree of Frost

A degree of frost is a non-standard unit of measure for air temperature meaning degrees below melting point (also known as "freezing point") of water (32 degrees Fahrenheit or 0 degrees Celsius). "Degree" in this case can refer to degree Celsius or Fahrenheit.

When based on Celsius, 0 degrees of frost is the same as 0°C, and any other value is simply the negative of the Celsius temperature. When based on Fahrenheit, the conversion is a bit more complicated, as 0 degrees of frost is equal to 32°F. Conversion formulas:

  • T = 32°F - T
  • T = 32°F - T (degrees of frost)

The term 'degrees of frost' was widely used in Apsley Cherry-Garrard's account of his Antarctic adventures in "The Worst Journey in the World". He recorded 109.5 (Fahrenheit) degrees of frost (-77.5 °F or -60.8 °C).

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