Degree of A Field Extension

In mathematics, more specifically field theory, the degree of a field extension is a rough measure of the "size" of the extension. The concept plays an important role in many parts of mathematics, including algebra and number theory — indeed in any area where fields appear prominently.

Read more about Degree Of A Field Extension:  Definition and Notation, The Multiplicativity Formula For Degrees, Examples, Generalization

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Degree (mathematics) - Degree of A Field Extension
... Given a field extension K/F, the field K can be considered as a vector space over the field F ... The dimension of this vector space is the degree of the extension and is denoted by ...

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