Daily Politics - Daily Politics Election Debates

Daily Politics Election Debates

During the run up to the 2010 General Election the Daily Politics held a series of special editions of the programme featuring debates involving members of the incumbent Labour Cabinet and their Conservative and Liberal Democrat equivalents. These debates ran alongside the main leaders' debates held for the first time in 2010. Starting on Monday 19 April, there were nine debates held on Mondays, Tuesdays and Wednesdays for the three weeks before 6 May. Andrew Neil acted as moderator, along with a specialist BBC correspondent.

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