Dada

Dada ( /ˈdɑːdɑː/) or Dadaism was an art movement of the European avant-garde in the early twentieth century. It began in Zurich, Switzerland in 1916, spreading to Berlin shortly thereafter. To quote Dona Budd's The Language of Art Knowledge,

Dada was born out of negative reaction to the horrors of World War I. This international movement was begun by a group of artists and poets associated with the Cabaret Voltaire in Zurich. Dada rejected reason and logic, prizing nonsense, irrationality and intuition. The origin of the name Dada is unclear; some believe that it is a nonsensical word. Others maintain that it originates from the Romanian artists Tristan Tzara and Marcel Janco's frequent use of the words da, da, meaning yes, yes in the Romanian language. Another theory says that the name "Dada" came during a meeting of the group when a paper knife stuck into a French-German dictionary happened to point to 'dada', a French word for 'hobbyhorse'.

The movement primarily involved visual arts, literature, poetry, art manifestoes, art theory, theatre, and graphic design, and concentrated its anti-war politics through a rejection of the prevailing standards in art through anti-art cultural works. In addition to being anti-war, Dada was also anti-bourgeois and had political affinities with the radical left.

Dada activities included public gatherings, demonstrations, and publication of art/literary journals; passionate coverage of art, politics, and culture were topics often discussed in a variety of media. Key figures in the movement included Hugo Ball, Emmy Hennings, Hans Arp, Raoul Hausmann, Hannah Höch, Johannes Baader, Tristan Tzara, Francis Picabia, Richard Huelsenbeck, Georg Grosz, John Heartfield, Marcel Duchamp, Beatrice Wood, Kurt Schwitters, and Hans Richter, among others. The movement influenced later styles like the avant-garde and downtown music movements, and groups including surrealism, Nouveau réalisme, pop art and Fluxus.

Dada is the groundwork to abstract art and sound poetry, a starting point for performance art, a prelude to postmodernism, an influence on pop art, a celebration of antiart to be later embraced for anarcho-political uses in the 1960s and the movement that lay the foundation for Surrealism.

Read more about Dada:  Overview, Poetry; Music and Sound, Legacy

Other articles related to "dada":

Surrealist Groups - Founding of The Movement
... and in the interim many became involved with Dada, believing that excessive rational thought and bourgeois values had brought the conflict of the war upon the world ... After the war, when they returned to Paris, the Dada activities continued ... Back in Paris, Breton joined in Dada activities and started the literary journal Littérature along with Louis Aragon and Philippe Soupault ...
Late Modernism - Radical Movements in Modern Art - Fauvism, Cubism, Dada, Surrealism As The Precedent
... This and Duchamp's other works are generally labelled as Dada ... From a chronological point of view Dada is located solidly within modernism, however a number of critics have held that it anticipates postmodernism, while others, such as Ihab ...
List Of Ultraman Monsters - Dada
... the ground work for an invasion of planet Earth, Dada is capable of masquerading as a normal-looking human or growing to titanic size ... Dada can also rotate through one of three different heads to confuse and distract it's enemies ...
Man And Boy: Dada
... Man and Boy Dada is a 2003 opera by Michael Nyman on a libretto by Michael Hastings ... It tells the story of a friendship between aging dada artist Kurt Schwitters and a twelve-year-old boy ...
Michel Sanouillet - Selected Bibliography
1965, Dada à Paris, Paris, Jean-Jacques Pauvert. 1968, Metafisica, Dada, Surrealismo, Milan, Fabbri (with Patrick Waldberg and Robert Lebel). 1969, Dada, Paris, Fernand Hazan ...

Famous quotes containing the word dada:

    The Dada object reflected an ironic posture before the consecrated forms of art. The surrealist object differs significantly in this respect. It stands for a mysterious relationship with the outer world established by man’s sensibility in a way that involves concrete forms in projecting the artist’s inner model.
    —J.H. Matthews. “Object Lessons,” The Imagery of Surrealism, Syracuse University Press (1977)

    [A] Dada exhibition. Another one! What’s the matter with everyone wanting to make a museum piece out of Dada? Dada was a bomb ... can you imagine anyone, around half a century after a bomb explodes, wanting to collect the pieces, sticking it together and displaying it?
    Max Ernst (1891–1976)

    Dada hurts. Dada does not jest, for the reason that it was experienced by revolutionary men and not by philistines who demand that art be a decoration for the mendacity of their own emotions.... I am firmly convinced that all art will become dadaistic in the course of time, because from Dada proceeds the perpetual urge for its renovation.
    Richard Huelsenbeck (1892–1974)