Culture of The Dominican Republic

class="left_top_holder">

The people and their customs have origins mixing of Spaniard, African and Taino roots. The Dominican Republic was the first Spanish colony in the New World. Diseases inadvertently brought by the Spanish previously unknown to the native inhabitants wiped out the vast majority of the Taino Indians on the island; the colonizers thus began importing massive numbers of African slaves to replace the natives. After the Haitian liberation of the entire island, slavery was abolished and free blacks (and those of mixed race) could be found all over the islands. The Dominican republic's meals consist of mostly beef, chicken, pork, or fish. The most important meal for them is lunch. What Dominicans tend to eat depends highly on where they live, so pigs are farmed heavily.


However, there are differences in class and education that separate different groups. The wealthy privileged status elite are mostly of Spaniard, (others include Italian and French) and to a lesser extent, African descent, while the majority of the lower class are Mulattoes of primarily African descent. The metropolitan culture available to the upper class and vanishing (due to economic turbulence as of late) middle class is often comparable to the life of city dwellers in the rich countries of Western Europe and the United States. But this metropolitan culture doesn't reach the poorest people, who may not have the most basic amenities, necessities, running water, electricity, sanitary facilities nor consumer electronics.

Other articles related to "culture of the dominican republic, the dominican republic, dominican republic":

Outline Of The Dominican Republic - Culture of The Dominican Republic - Sports in The Dominican Republic
... Main article Sports in the Dominican Republic Football in the Dominican Republic The Dominican Republic at the Olympics ...

Famous quotes containing the words republic and/or culture:

    It was the most ungrateful and unjust act ever perpetrated by a republic upon a class of citizens who had worked and sacrificed and suffered as did the women of this nation in the struggle of the Civil War only to be rewarded at its close by such unspeakable degradation as to be reduced to the plane of subjects to enfranchised slaves.
    Anna Howard Shaw (1847–1919)

    I know that there are many persons to whom it seems derogatory to link a body of philosophic ideas to the social life and culture of their epoch. They seem to accept a dogma of immaculate conception of philosophical systems.
    John Dewey (1859–1952)