Cross - As A Design Element

As A Design Element

Picture Cross name Description
Compass rose A compass rose, sometimes called a windrose, is a figure on a compass, map, nautical chart or monument used to display the orientation of the cardinal directions and often appears as a cross tapering to triangular points.
Crossed keys Symbol of the Papacy used in various emblems representing the keys to heaven.
Crossed swords The crossed swords symbol (⚔ at Unicode U+2694) is used to represent battlegrounds on maps. It is also used to show that person died in battle or that a war machine was lost in action. Two crossed swords also look like a Christian cross and the mixed symbolism has been used in military decorations. it is also a popular way to display swords on a wall often with a shield in the center
Dagger/Obelisk a typographical symbol or glyph. The term "obelisk" derives from Greek ὀβελίσκος (obeliskos), which means "little obelus"; from Ancient Greek: ὀβελός (obelos) meaning "roasting spit". It was originally represented by the ÷ symbol and was first used by Ancient Greek scholars as critical marks in manuscripts.
Four-leaf clover used as a symbol for luck as well as a stand in for a cross in various works.
Isometric illusion crosses frame this cube that appears to be hollow or solid and projected either inward or outward. a similar design was photographed in a crop circle. This design can be made by repeating the central hexagon outward once on all 6 sides then erasing some inner line segments and filling in the voids.
Skull and crossbones traditionally used to mark Spanish cemeteries; the symbol evolved to represent death/danger, poison, and pirates.

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Famous quotes containing the words element and/or design:

    To be radical, an empiricism must neither admit into its constructions any element that is not directly experienced, nor exclude from them any element that is directly experienced.
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