Crop Circle

A crop circle is a sizable pattern created by the flattening of a crop such as wheat, barley, rye, maize, or rapeseed. Crop circles are also referred to as crop formations, because they are not always circular in shape. The documented cases have substantially increased from the 1970s to current times. In 1991, two hoaxers confessed and claimed authorship of circles throughout England.

Twenty-six countries reported approximately 10,000 crop circles in the last third of the 20th century; 90% of those were located in southern England. Many of the formations appearing in that area are positioned near ancient monuments, such as Stonehenge. According to one study, nearly half of all circles found in the UK in 2003 were located within a 15 km (9.3 miles) radius of Avebury. Archeological remains can cause cropmarks in the fields, in the shapes of circles and squares, but they do not appear overnight and they are always in the same places every year.

Read more about Crop Circle:  History, Explanations, Folklore, In Popular Culture, Gallery

Other articles related to "crop, crop circle":

Jungfrau Park - Controversy
... decided to have a special exhibition on crop-circles and also a hoaxing-competition ... to the competition, land surveyor and artist Vitali Kuljasov was asked to create a complex crop circle ... The creation of the crop-circle would be caught on surveillance that was set up at the park to document the work of Vitali Kuljasov ...
Crop Circle - Gallery
... A crop circle in Switzerland Aerial view of crop formation in Diessenhofen, Switzerland, July 2008 A crop circle in the form of a triskelion ...

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