Criticism of The Seventh-day Adventist Church

Criticism Of The Seventh-day Adventist Church

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Since the denomination's founding in the mid-19th century, the Seventh-day Adventist Church has been receiving criticism from various individuals and groups. These criticisms include objections to its teachings, structure, and practices.

Read more about Criticism Of The Seventh-day Adventist Church:  Major Critics, Ellen G. White

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