Courts of Justice Act 1924

Courts Of Justice Act 1924

The Courts of Justice Act, 1924 was an Act of the Oireachtas (No. 10 of 1924) that established a new system of courts for the Irish Free State (Saorstát Éireann, now the Republic of Ireland). Among the new courts was the Supreme Court of the Irish Free State, and the first Chief Justice of the Irish Free State was also appointed under the Act.

Once the Act came into operation, the courts previously established by the Parliament of the United Kingdom (when Ireland was still part of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland) ceased to exist. In parallel with this process, the revolutionary Dáil Courts system created in 1919– during the War of Independence was also wound up, by Acts passed in 1923 and 1925.

The long title of the Act was:

An Act for the establishment of courts of justice pursuant to the Constitution of Saorstát Éireann and for purposes relating to the better administration of justice.

Read more about Courts Of Justice Act 1924:  The New System

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