Courts of England and Wales

Courts Of England And Wales

Her Majesty's Courts of Justice of England and Wales are the civil and criminal courts responsible for the administration of justice in England and Wales; they apply English law, the law of England and Wales, and are established under Acts of the Parliament of the United Kingdom.

The United Kingdom does not have a single unified legal system—England and Wales have one system, Scotland another, and Northern Ireland a third. There are exceptions to this rule; for example in immigration law, the Asylum and Immigration Tribunal's jurisdiction covers the whole of the United Kingdom, while in employment law there is a single system of Employment Tribunals for England, Wales, and Scotland (but not Northern Ireland).

The Court of Appeal, the High Court, the Crown Court, the Magistrates' Courts, and the County Courts are administered by Her Majesty's Courts and Tribunals Service, an executive agency of the Ministry of Justice.

Read more about Courts Of England And Wales:  Supreme Court of The United Kingdom, Judicial Committee of The Privy Council, The Senior Courts of England and Wales, Subordinate Courts, Special Courts and Tribunals, Criminal Cases, Appeals, Civil Cases, History

Other articles related to "courts of england and wales, courts of, wales, court":

Courts Of England And Wales - History - Local Courts of Special Jurisdiction
... The Courts of Session of the County Palatine of Chester and the Principality of Wales were abolished section 14 of by the Law Terms Act 1830 ... The Court of the County of Durham was abolished by section 2 of the Durham (County Palatine) Act 1836 ... The Stannary Court was abolished by the Stannaries Court (Abolition) Act 1896 ...

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