Corporation For Public Broadcasting

The Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB) is a non-profit corporation created by an act of the United States Congress and funded by the United States federal government to promote public broadcasting. Between 15 and 20 percent of the aggregate revenues of all public broadcasting stations have been funded from federal sources, principally through the CPB.

The CPB was created on November 7, 1967, when U.S. president Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Public Broadcasting Act of 1967. The new organization initially collaborated with the existing National Educational Television network. In 1969, the CPB talked to private groups to start the Public Broadcasting Service (PBS). In 1970, the CPB formed National Public Radio (NPR), a radio network consisting of public stations.

The CPB provides some funding for the PBS, NPR, and, to a lesser extent, for other broadcasters that are independent of those organizations. In more recent years, the CPB has started funding some Internet-based projects.

Read more about Corporation For Public BroadcastingFunding of And By The Corporation, Political Composition of The CPB Board, Objectivity and Balance Requirements

Other articles related to "corporation for public broadcasting, public, corporation, public broadcasting":

Henry Loomis - Corporation For Public Broadcasting
... in September 1972 as president of the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, overseeing money to be allocated to public television stations, in an appointment that Time magazine described as ... who had been the first head of the Corporation when it was established in 1969, and had been a longtime advocate of centralization of public broadcasting ... Loomis removed control over programming from the Public Broadcasting Service, decentralizing control and redistributing the funds to local stations ...
Corporation For Public Broadcasting - Objectivity and Balance Requirements
... The Public Broadcasting Act of 1967 requires the CPB to operate with a "strict adherence to objectivity and balance in all programs or series of programs of a controversial nature" ...

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