Corey Hughes - Playing Career

Playing Career

Hughes played for the Canterbury Bulldogs at five-eighth in their loss at the 1998 NRL grand final to the Brisbane Broncos. He played for the Bulldogs from the interchange bench in their 2004 NRL grand final victory over cross-town rivals, the Sydney Roosters.

In 2005, Corey Hughes was involved in a brawl at the Kembla Grange Racecourse. He was fined by the Bulldogs but has refused to pay it.

Hughes signed a one year deal with the Cronulla-Sutherland Sharks for 2009 and retired the next year.

Read more about this topic:  Corey Hughes

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