Convention On The Continental Shelf

The Convention on the Continental Shelf was an international treaty created to codify the rules of international law relating to continental shelves. The treaty, after entering into force 10 June 1964, established the rights of a sovereign state over the continental shelf surrounding it, if there be any. The treaty was one of three agreed upon at the first United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS I). It has since been superseded by a new agreement reached in 1982 at UNCLOS III.

The treaty dealt with seven topics: the regime governing the superjacent waters and airspace; laying or maintenance of submarine cables or pipelines; the regime governing navigation, fishing, scientific research and the coastal state's competence in these areas; delimitation; tunneling.

Read more about Convention On The Continental ShelfHistorical Background, Rights of States, Participants, UNCLOS II and III

Other articles related to "convention on the continental shelf, the continental shelf, convention":

Convention On The Continental Shelf - UNCLOS II and III
... The new definition of the Continental shelf in the new Convention rendered the 1958 Convention on the Continental Shelf obsolete ...

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