Control - Science and Technology

Science and Technology

  • Argument control, in linguistics
  • Biological pest control, a natural method of controlling pests such as insects, weeds, and plant diseases
  • Control engineering, a discipline of modeling and controlling of systems
  • Control flow, the means of specifying the sequence of operations in computer programs
  • Control key, on a computer keyboard
  • Control network, a set of reference-points of known geospatial coordinates
  • Control point (orienteering)
  • Control system, the ability to control some mechanical or chemical equipment
  • Control theory, the mathematical theory about controlling dynamical systems over time
  • Controlling for a variable, in statistics
  • GUI widget (control or widget), a component of a graphical user interface
  • Scientific control to isolate variables in experiments
  • Self-control, ability to control one's emotions and desires
  • Social control
  • Locus of control, extent to which individuals believe that they can control events that affect them
  • Lorazepam, sold under the trade name Control
  • Chlordiazepoxide, also sold under the trade name Control

Read more about this topic:  Control

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Famous quotes containing the words science and technology, science and, technology and/or science:

    Our civilization is shifting from science and technology to rhetoric and litigation.
    Mason Cooley (b. 1927)

    Imagination could hardly do without metaphor, for imagination is, literally, the moving around in one’s mind of images, and such images tend commonly to be metaphoric. Creative minds, as we know, are rich in images and metaphors, and this is true in science and art alike. The difference between scientist and artist has little to do with the ways of the creative imagination; everything to do with the manner of demonstration and verification of what has been seen or imagined.
    Robert A. Nisbet (b. 1913)

    The real accomplishment of modern science and technology consists in taking ordinary men, informing them narrowly and deeply and then, through appropriate organization, arranging to have their knowledge combined with that of other specialized but equally ordinary men. This dispenses with the need for genius. The resulting performance, though less inspiring, is far more predictable.
    John Kenneth Galbraith (b. 1908)

    Human Nature is the only science of man; and yet has been hitherto the most neglected.
    David Hume (1711–1776)