Condition

Condition or conditions may refer to:

Read more about Condition:  Logic, Computer Programming, The Arts, Other

Other articles related to "condition, conditions":

Characterization of Practical Numbers
... It is not difficult to prove that this condition is necessary and sufficient for a number to be practical ... In one direction, this condition is clearly necessary in order to be able to represent as a sum of divisors of n ... In the other direction, the condition is sufficient, as can be shown by induction ...
Rumination Disorder - History
... a physician in the nineteenth century, Charles-Édouard Brown-Séquard, who acquired the condition as the result of experiments upon himself ... in a variety of ways in response to a variety of conditions ... was described and treated as a benign condition ...
Ethics (Scientology) - Statistics
... the Scientologist is amply equipped to determine exactly what condition an activity is in, and thus exactly what steps he must take in order to better that condition." According to The Scientology ... on graphs, and then for analysis of these graphs in terms of five levels of "Ethics Conditions" ... The main categories for these conditions are Non-existence condition line on graph steeply or vertically down ...
Deokhye, Princess Of Korea - Arranged Marriage
... dementia, but by the following year, her condition seemed to have improved ... against it, and it had been postphoned because of her condition, but when she recovered, she was immediately given instructions that the marriage was to take place ... After this, her condition deteriorated ...
Heaviside Condition
... The Heaviside condition, due to Oliver Heaviside (1850–1925), is the condition an electrical transmission line must meet in order for there to be no distortion of a transmitted ... Also known as the distortionless condition, it can be used to improve the performance of a transmission line by adding loading to the cable ...

Famous quotes containing the word condition:

    Beautiful credit! The foundation of modern society. Who shall say that this is not the golden age of mutual trust, of unlimited reliance upon human promises? That is a peculiar condition of society which enables a whole nation to instantly recognize point and meaning in the familiar newspaper anecdote, which puts into the mouth of a distinguished speculator in lands and mines this remark:M”I wasn’t worth a cent two years ago, and now I owe two millions of dollars.”
    Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835–1910)

    Demoniac possession is mythical; but the faculty of being possessed, more less completely, by an idea is probably the fundamental condition of what is called genius, whether it show itself in the saint, the artist, or the man of science.
    Thomas Henry Huxley (1825–95)

    The first condition for making music is not to make a noise.
    José Bergamín (1895–1983)