Compassion

Compassion is the virtue of empathy for the suffering of others. It is regarded as a fundamental part of human love, and a cornerstone of greater social interconnection and humanism —foundational to the highest principles in philosophy, society, and personhood.

Compassion is often regarded as emotional in nature, and there is an aspect of compassion which regards a quantitative dimension, such that individual's compassion is often given a property of "depth," "vigour," or "passion." The etymology of "compassion" is Latin, meaning "co-suffering." More virtuous than simple empathy, compassion commonly gives rise to an active desire to alleviate another's suffering. It is often, though not inevitably, the key component in what manifests in the social context as altruism. In ethical terms, the various expressions down the ages of the so-called Golden Rule embody by implication the principle of compassion: Do to others what you would have them do to you.

The English noun compassion, meaning to suffer together with, comes from the Latin. Its prefix com- comes directly from com, an archaic version of the Latin preposition and affix cum (= with); the -passion segment is derived from passus, past participle of the deponent verb patior, patī, passus sum. Compassion is thus related in origin, form and meaning to the English noun patient (= one who suffers), from patiens, present participle of the same patior, and is akin to the Greek verb πάσχειν (= paskhein, to suffer) and to its cognate noun πάθος (= pathos). Ranked a great virtue in numerous philosophies, compassion is considered in almost all the major religious traditions as among the greatest of virtues.

Read more about Compassion:  Neuroscience, Psychology, Historical

Other articles related to "compassion":

Day Of Compassion
... Day Of Compassion was an annual television special (1993–98) which honored those who have AIDS or who are HIV-positive ... Leritz continued for three seasons "Day Of Compassion" became the largest one-day event in television history with over 200 shows on the air soaps, talk shows, cable and news ...
Compassion (disambiguation)
... Compassion is a profound and positive human emotion prompted by the pain of others ... The following are related Compassion fatigue Radical compassion Self-compassion Compassion may also refer to Nīlakantha dhāranī - "Great Compassion" - Great ...
Michael David (painter) - Painting Career
... Of the series, David has said, "My work (became) about compassion ... Compassion for those different from us, compassion for each other, and, most importantly, compassion for oneself, for a painter who was reckless enough to hurt himself ...
Compassion (disambiguation) - Entertainment
... Compassion (Doctor Who), a fictional character in the Eighth Doctor Adventures novels Love! Valour! Compassion!, Broadway play Love! Valour! Compassion! (film), American film based on the play Compassion ...
Compassion - Historical
... “Greek and Roman philosophers distrusted (feeling) compassion ... They regarded compassion (a virtue) as an affect, neither admirable nor contemptible.” Thomas Szasz from his book "Cruel Compassion" ...

Famous quotes containing the word compassion:

    A Curate there is something which excites compassion in the very name of a curate!!!
    Sydney Smith (1771–1845)

    It is very difficult to be wholly joyous or wholly sad on this earth. The comic, when it is human, soon takes upon itself a face of pain; and some of our griefs ... have their source in weaknesses which must be recognized with smiling compassion as the common inheritance of us all.
    Joseph Conrad (1857–1924)

    When our kids are young, many of us rush out to buy a cute little baby book to record the meaningful events of our young child’s life...But I’ve often thought there should be a second book, one with room to record the moral milestones of our child’s lives. There might be space to record dates she first shared or showed compassion or befriended a new student or thought of sending Grandma a get-well card or told the truth despite its cost.
    Fred G. Gosman (20th century)