In grammar, the comparative is the form of an adjective or adverb which denotes the degree or grade by which a person, thing, or other entity has a property or quality greater or less in extent than that of another, and is used in this context with a subordinating conjunction, such as than. The comparative is one of the degrees of comparison, along with the positive and the superlative.

Read more about ComparativeStructure, Two-clause Sentences, Adverbs, Absolute Comparative

Other articles related to "comparative":

Centre For Comparative Welfare Studies (CCWS)
... Centre for Comparative Welfare Studies (CCWS), Department of Economics, Politics and Public Administration, Aalborg University, (founded in 1995) is a multidisciplinary research group ... Focus is on comparative studies, or on the Danish and the Scandinavian welfare states in a comparative perspective ...
Cole Durham
... active specialist in religious freedom law, involved in comparative law scholarship, with a special emphasis on comparative constitutional law ... From 1989 to 1994 he served as Secretary of the American Society of Comparative Law, and he is also an Associate Member of the International Academy of Comparative Law in Paris—the ... "Religion and the Secular State" at the 28th International Congress of Comparative Law, held in Washington, D.C ...
Studies In Comparative Religion
... Studies in Comparative Religion was a quarterly academic journal published from 1963–1987 that contained essays on the spiritual practices and religious symbolism of the world's religions ... on the subject of traditional studies and comparative religion ...
Absolute Comparative - Greater/lesser
... may at first sight appear as a kind of null comparative, when as is usual, they are cited without their opposite counterpart ... adjectives (or adverbial constructs), so losing their comparative connotation ... or Greater New York versus New York City, it is not part of the "comparative" in the grammatical sense this article describes ...
Comparative (disambiguation)
... A comparative is a form of an adjective or adverb indicating greater degree ... Comparative may also refer to ...

Famous quotes containing the word comparative:

    Our comparative fidelity was fear of defeat at the hands of another partner.
    Max Frisch (1911–1991)

    The hill farmer ... always seems to make out somehow with his corn patch, his few vegetables, his rifle, and fishing rod. This self-contained economy creates in the hillman a comparative disinterest in the world’s affairs, along with a disdain of lowland ways. “I don’t go to question the good Lord in his wisdom,” runs the phrasing attributed to a typical mountaineer, “but I jest cain’t see why He put valleys in between the hills.”
    —Administration in the State of Arka, U.S. public relief program (1935-1943)

    The utmost familiarity with dead streams, or with the ocean, would not prepare a man for this peculiar navigation; and the most skillful boatman anywhere else would here be obliged to take out his boat and carry round a hundred times, still with great risk, as well as delay, where the practiced batteau-man poles up with comparative ease and safety.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)