Companion (Doctor Who)

Companion (Doctor Who)

In the long-running BBC television science fiction programme Doctor Who and related works, the term "companion" refers to a character who travels with, and shares the adventures of the Doctor. In most Doctor Who stories, the primary companion acts as an audience surrogate. He or (more commonly) she provides the lens through which the viewer is introduced to the series. The companion character, many times, furthers the story by asking questions and getting into trouble, or by helping, rescuing or challenging the Doctor. This designation is applied to a character by the show's producers, and appears in the BBC's promotional material and off-screen fictional terminology. Until the modern revival of the series in 2005, the term was rarely used on-screen. The Doctor also refers to the show's other leads as his "friends" or "assistants"; the British press have also used the latter term.

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Famous quotes containing the word companion:

    One who was my companion in my two previous excursions to these woods, tells me that ... he found himself dining one day on moose-meat, mud turtle, trout, and beaver, and he thought that there were few places in the world where these dishes could easily be brought together on one table.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)