Communion of Evangelical Episcopal Churches

The Communion of Evangelical Episcopal Churches is an Anglican Christian Communion, formed in 1995 largely as a result of the Convergence Movement. The CEEC converges the evangelical, charismatic, liturgical, and sacramental traditions of the Christian faith.

Read more about Communion Of Evangelical Episcopal Churches:  Beliefs, Organization, History

Other articles related to "communion of evangelical episcopal churches, episcopal, communion of, evangelical, churches":

Communion Of Evangelical Episcopal Churches - History
... In early 1994 members of a charismatic renewal parish in the Episcopal Church USA, together with their rector, began to conceptualize a vision of a new communion of churches that would be ... and agreed to serve as transitional Presiding Bishop for the new body, tentatively called the Evangelical Episcopal Church ... Mission movement and had oversight over a number of churches in Kenya.) In October 1995 in Fredericksburg, Virginia, approximately 300 people gathered, representing a wide variety of denominational ...

Famous quotes containing the words communion of, churches, evangelical and/or communion:

    O my Brothers! love your Country. Our Country is our home, the home which God has given us, placing therein a numerous family which we love and are loved by, and with which we have a more intimate and quicker communion of feeling and thought than with others; a family which by its concentration upon a given spot, and by the homogeneous nature of its elements, is destined for a special kind of activity.
    Giuseppe Mazzini (1805–1872)

    He asked if I would sell my Christmas trees;
    My woods the young fir balsams like a place
    Where houses all are churches and have spires.
    I hadn’t thought of them as Christmas trees.
    Robert Frost (1874–1963)

    Chastity is a monkish and evangelical superstition, a greater foe to natural temperance even than unintellectual sensuality.
    Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792–1822)

    In compensation for considerable disgust, despondency, and boredom—such as living in solitude without friends, books, duties, or passions necessarily entails—we are given those quarter-hours of deepest communion with ourselves and nature. Those who completely barricade themselves from boredom, barricade themselves from themselves as well: they will never get to drink the most refreshingly potent draught from the their own innermost fountain.
    Friedrich Nietzsche (1844–1900)