Comics Code

Some articles on comics, comics code, comic, code:

Peter Parker - Publication History - Commercial Success
... and was shocked to find it to have been one of the nascent Marvel's highest-selling comics ... character's extra-length stories in the comics magazine The Spectacular Spider-Man, a proto-graphic novel designed to appeal to older readers ... An early 1970s Spider-Man story led to the revision of the Comics Code ...
Portrayal Of Black People In Comics - 1956: Comics Code Authority Tries To Censor "Judgment Day"
... a Black man in a position of authority and a discussion of racism in a comic was at the centre of a battle between Entertaining Comics editor William Gaines and the Comics Code Authority ... The particular example noted by comics historian Digby Diehl, Gaines threatened Judge Charles Murphy, the Comics Code Administrator, with a lawsuit when Murphy ordered EC to alter the science-fiction story ... The story, by writer Al Feldstein and artist Joe Orlando, was a reprint from the pre-Code Weird Fantasy #18 (April 1953), inserted when the Code Authority had ...
Incredible Science Fiction - Comics Code
... because it now had to follow the tight standards of the Comics Code, which was created in 1954 to censor the controversial comics of that time ... Eventually the Comics Code would spell the end of not only this comic, but all comics produced by EC ... a story in issue 33 did not meet the standards of the Code, publisher Bill Gaines and editor Al Feldstein decided to reprint the story "Judgment Day!" (originally in Weird Fantasy #18) ...
Green Goblin Reborn! - Historical Significance
... This was the first story arc in mainstream comics that portrayed and condemned the abuse of drugs ... This effectively led to the revision of the Comics Code ... Previously, the Code forbade the depiction of the use of illegal drugs, even negatively ...

Famous quotes containing the word code:

    Many people will say to working mothers, in effect, “I don’t think you can have it all.” The phrase for “have it all” is code for “have your cake and eat it too.” What these people really mean is that achievement in the workplace has always come at a price—usually a significant personal price; conversely, women who stayed home with their children were seen as having sacrificed a great deal of their own ambition for their families.
    Anne C. Weisberg (20th century)