Columbia School of Engineering and Applied Science

Columbia School Of Engineering And Applied Science

The Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science (popularly known as SEAS or Columbia Engineering) is the engineering and applied science school of Columbia University. Columbia, originally chartered as King's College in 1754, is the fifth oldest institution of higher learning in the United States. The Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science was founded as the School of Mines in 1863 and then the School of Mines, Engineering and Chemistry before becoming the School of Engineering and Applied Science. It is the country's third such institution and the oldest in New York City after Polytechnic Institute of New York University. On October 1, 1997, the school was renamed in honor of Chinese businessman Z. Y. Fu, who had donated $26 million to the school.

Today, the Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science is a premier and exclusive engineering school known for the depth and breadth of its offerings as well as its cutting-edge, interdisciplinary research with other academic, corporate institutions including NASA, IBM, MIT, and The Earth Institute. It is also known for numerous patents which generate over $100 million annually for the university. SEAS faculty and alumni are responsible for technological achievements including the developments of FM radio and the maser. As of today, Columbia Engineering is the only academic institution to hold a share of patents for MPEG-2 technology.

The School's applied mathematics, biomedical engineering, and computer science programs are each regarded as one of the strongest programs in the United States according to US News and the National Research Council; its Financial Engineering program in Operations Research is one of the best in the nation and is ranked in the top 3 worldwide. The current SEAS faculty include 27 members of the National Academy of Engineering and one Nobel Laureate in a faculty size of 173. In all, the faculty and alumni of Columbia Engineering have won 9 Nobel Prizes in physics, chemistry, medicine, and economics.

The small engineering school with around 300 undergraduates in each graduating class also draws upon Columbia University's endowment, in excess of $7 billion dollars, and maintains close links with all of the university's graduate schools and its undergraduate liberal arts sister school Columbia College which offers Bachelor of Arts degree. The School's current administrative interim dean is Donald Goldfarb.

Read more about Columbia School Of Engineering And Applied ScienceAdmissions, Distance Learning, Facilities, Notable Alumni, Affiliates of The School, Departmental Links, Specialized Centers, Specialized Labs, Related Centers, Other Programs

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Columbia School Of Engineering And Applied Science - Other Programs
... Opportunities Materials Science and Engineering Program in the Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, sharing teaching and research with the faculty from ... APAM Webpage Program Webpage Computer Engineering Administered by both the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Departments through a joint Computer Engineering Committee ... Students complete the requirements for the liberal arts degree along with a pre-engineering course of study in three years at their college and then complete two years at Columbia ...

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