Colonial History of New Jersey - Religion - Religious Society of Friends

Religious Society of Friends

Much of West Jersey was settled by Quakers who established congregations and founded towns throughout the region, including eponymous Quakertown in 1744. Among the meeting houses built in the colonial era are:

Year Locale Year
Seaville Friends Meeting House Seaville 1716
Woodbury Friends' Meetinghouse Woodbury c.1715
Bordentown Friends Meetinghouse Bordentown 1740
Smith Friends Meetinghouse Harmony 1753
Alloways Creek Friends Meetinghouse Hancock's Bridge 1756
Dover Friends Meetinghouse Dover 1758
Evesham Friends Meeting House Mount Laurel 1760
Greenwich Friends Meetinghouse Greenwich 1771
Salem Friends Meetinghouse Salem 1773
Chesterfields Friends Meetinghouse Crosswicks 1773
Arney's Mount Friends Meetinghouse Pemberton 1775
Copenney Friends Meetinghouse 1775
Trenton Friends Meeting House Trenton 1776

Read more about this topic:  Colonial History Of New Jersey, Religion

Other articles related to "religious society of friends":

Religion In York - Religious Society of Friends
... There are three meeting houses of the Religious Society of Friends in York although meetings are held at other venues including The Retreat and University of York ... York has a long association with the Religious Society of Friends, known as the Quakers, and founded two schools in the city Bootham School in 1823 and The Mount in 1831 ...

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