Code Points

Some articles on code, code point, code points, codes:

Code Page 775 - Code Page Layout
... The following table shows code page 775 ... Each character is shown with its equivalent Unicode code point and its decimal code point ... Only the second half of the table (code points 128–255) is shown, the first half (code points 0–127) being the same as ASCII although code points 1–31 and 127 (00–1Fhex) have a different ...
Macintosh Cyrillic Encoding
... Each character is shown with its equivalent Unicode code point and its decimal code point ... Only the second half of the table (code points 128–255) is shown, the first half (code points 0–127) being the same as ASCII. 253 ю 254 €* 255 _0 _1 _2 _3 _4 _5 _6 _7 _8 _9 _A _B _C _D _E _F *^ ^ ^ These code points have been redefined since the original definition of the Macintosh ...
JIS X 0208 - History - Future
... In practice, many systems define and use unassigned code points in JIS X 0208 ... The code points of these gaiji conflict with the code points that JIS X 0213 codes use, so there would be some difficulty in migrating these systems from JIS X 0208 to JIS X 0213 ...
GNU Unifont - Status
... The Unicode Basic Multilingual Plane covers 216 = 65,536 code points ... This leaves approximately 57,000 code points to which glyphs can be assigned ... Some of these code points are special values that do not have an assigned glyph, but most do have assigned glyphs ...
Code Page 437 - Characters - Interpretation of Code Points 1–31 and 127
... Code points 1–31 and 127 (00–1Fhex and 7Fhex) may be interpreted as control or graphic characters, depending on the context ... When used in a memory-mapped video display buffer, the code point is displayed as the graphic shown in the table of special graphic characters below ... In other situations, these code points are used as controls, as shown in the standard code page table ...

Famous quotes containing the words points and/or code:

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