Code Points

Some articles on code points, code point, code, codes:

Code Page 437 - Characters - Interpretation of Code Points 1–31 and 127
... Code points 1–31 and 127 (00–1Fhex and 7Fhex) may be interpreted as control or graphic characters, depending on the context ... When used in a memory-mapped video display buffer, the code point is displayed as the graphic shown in the table of special graphic characters below ... In other situations, these code points are used as controls, as shown in the standard code page table ...
JIS X 0208 - History - Future
... In practice, many systems define and use unassigned code points in JIS X 0208 ... The code points of these gaiji conflict with the code points that JIS X 0213 codes use, so there would be some difficulty in migrating these systems from JIS ...
Macintosh Cyrillic Encoding
... Each character is shown with its equivalent Unicode code point and its decimal code point ... Only the second half of the table (code points 128–255) is shown, the first half (code points 0–127) being the same as ASCII. _5 _6 _7 _8 _9 _A _B _C _D _E _F *^ ^ ^ These code points have been redefined since the original definition of the Macintosh Cyrillic encoding ...
Code Page 775 - Code Page Layout
... The following table shows code page 775 ... Each character is shown with its equivalent Unicode code point and its decimal code point ... Only the second half of the table (code points 128–255) is shown, the first half (code points 0–127) being the same as ASCII although code points 1–31 and 127 (00–1Fhex ...
GNU Unifont - Status
... This leaves approximately 57,000 code points to which glyphs can be assigned ... Some of these code points are special values that do not have an assigned glyph, but most do have assigned glyphs ...

Famous quotes containing the words points and/or code:

    There are good points about all such wars. People forget self. The virtues of magnanimity, courage, patriotism, etc., etc., are called into life. People are more generous, more sympathetic, better, than when engaged in the more selfish pursuits of peace.
    Rutherford Birchard Hayes (1822–1893)

    Wise Draco comes, deep in the midnight roll
    Of black artillery; he comes, though late;
    In code corroborating Calvin’s creed
    And cynic tyrannies of honest kings;
    He comes, nor parlies; and the Town, redeemed,
    Gives thanks devout; nor, being thankful, heeds
    The grimy slur on the Republic’s faith implied,
    Which holds that Man is naturally good,
    And—more—is Nature’s Roman, never to be
    scourged.
    Herman Melville (1819–1891)