Cloth Menstrual Pad

Cloth Menstrual Pad

Cloth menstrual pads are a reusable alternative to disposable sanitary napkins.

They receive praise for being environmentally friendly, cost-cutting, as well as having purported health benefits.

Generally they are made from layers of absorbent fabrics (such as cotton or hemp) which are worn by a woman while she is menstruating, for post-birth bleeding or any other situation where it is necessary to absorb the flow of blood from the vagina, or to protect one's panties from regular discharge of cervical mucus or other vaginal fluids. After use, they are washed, dried and then reused.

Read more about Cloth Menstrual Pad:  History, Current Use

Other articles related to "cloth menstrual pad, pads, menstrual pads":

Cloth Menstrual Pad - Perceived Advantages and Disadvantages - Disadvantages
... Washing reusable pads requires water ... Also, it is important that the water used to clean pads be disposed of appropriately ... and water used in the production of disposable menstrual pads ...

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