Clint Eastwood & General Saint

Clint Eastwood & General Saint were a reggae deejay duo of the early 1980s, consisting of Clint Eastwood (born Robert Anthony Brammer) and General Saint (born Winston Hislop). Noted for putting on lively, theatrical and humorous performances, Eastwood and Saint came to be known as a novelty act in Jamaica.

Jamaican Eastwood was already an established solo deejay with a string of albums behind him when he teamed up with British deejay Saint, their first release being "Tribute to General Echo", about the recently killed slack deejay. They hit the UK Singles Chart with their version of "Last Plane (One Way Ticket)" in 1984. Both of the duo's studio albums made the Top 5 of the UK Independent Chart. Saint went on to a solo career, releasing singles such as "Save The Last Dance For Me" and "Oh Carol" (both featuring Don Campbell). One of the duo's live performances was recorded by the BBC for their In Concert programme, and this was later released as an album.

The duo reunited to perform at the Luton Love Music Hate Racism festival with his children, wife, and the wife's mum at St. Georges Square in August 2010. They made a video for Love Music Hate Racism featuring Luton band Shabby Tinkerz, and performed live on Mark Lemarr's BBC Radio 2 show. They currently undertook a UK tour in 2011 and again in with a new album due out in 2013, on their new record label, Blujeanz Records.

Famous quotes containing the words clint eastwood, saint, general and/or clint:

    Go ahead. Make my day.
    Joseph Stinson, screenwriter, and Clint Eastwood. Harry Callahan (Clint Eastwood)

    Et Saint Apollinaire, raide et ascétique,
    Vieille usine désaffectée de Dieu, tient encore
    Dans ses pierres éecroulantes la forme précise de Byzance.
    —T.S. (Thomas Stearns)

    However energetically society in general may strive to make all the citizens equal and alike, the personal pride of each individual will always make him try to escape from the common level, and he will form some inequality somewhere to his own profit.
    Alexis de Tocqueville (1805–1859)

    Go ahead. Make my day.
    Joseph Stinson, screenwriter, and Clint Eastwood. Harry Callahan (Clint Eastwood)