Civil War News

Civil War News was a set of collectible trading cards issued in the early 1960s by Topps. The set featured the colorful artwork of Norman Saunders, as well as three other artists, and was characterized by vivid colors; graphic depictions of violence, death, and blood (number 21 "Painful Death" being a prime example) and exaggerations of warfare. On the reverse, each card contained a brief history of a campaign, battle, or person presented in a newspaper article like fashion, complete with headline.

The complete set consists of 88 cards, including a checklist, and was first printed for the United States market in 1962 to coincide with the centennial of the Civil War. A similar series with the same artwork was later issued in Canada, and A&BC produced a similar set in England. The cards were issued five to a wax pack, and were accompanied by facsimiles of paper currency of the Confederate States of America. The original selling price was a nickel per package. Topps later issued the cards in cellophane-wrapped strips ("cello packs").

Note: Since 1989 a monthly newspaper titled Civil War News has been published by Historical Publications, Inc. in Tunbridge, Vermont. See web site.

Read more about Civil War NewsChecklist of Confederate Currency

Famous quotes containing the words civil war, news, civil and/or war:

    We have heard all of our lives how, after the Civil War was over, the South went back to straighten itself out and make a living again. It was for many years a voiceless part of the government. The balance of power moved away from it—to the north and the east. The problems of the north and the east became the big problem of the country and nobody paid much attention to the economic unbalance the South had left as its only choice.
    Lyndon Baines Johnson (1908–1973)

    If you are one of the hewers of wood and drawers of small weekly paychecks, your letters will have to contain some few items of news or they will be accounted dry stuff.... But if you happen to be of a literary turn of mind, or are, in any way, likely to become famous, you may settle down to an afternoon of letter-writing on nothing more sprightly in the way of news than the shifting of the wind from south to south-east.
    Robert Benchley (1889–1945)

    The principle of majority rule is the mildest form in which the force of numbers can be exercised. It is a pacific substitute for civil war in which the opposing armies are counted and the victory is awarded to the larger before any blood is shed. Except in the sacred tests of democracy and in the incantations of the orators, we hardly take the trouble to pretend that the rule of the majority is not at bottom a rule of force.
    Walter Lippmann (1889–1974)

    Then think I thus: sith such repair,
    So long time war of valiant men,
    Was all to win a lady fair,
    Shall I not learn to suffer then,
    And think my life well spent to be,
    Serving a worthier wight than she?
    Henry Howard, Earl Of Surrey (1517?–1547)