Civil War News

Civil War News was a set of collectible trading cards issued in the early 1960s by Topps. The set featured the colorful artwork of Norman Saunders, as well as three other artists, and was characterized by vivid colors; graphic depictions of violence, death, and blood (number 21 "Painful Death" being a prime example) and exaggerations of warfare. On the reverse, each card contained a brief history of a campaign, battle, or person presented in a newspaper article like fashion, complete with headline.

The complete set consists of 88 cards, including a checklist, and was first printed for the United States market in 1962 to coincide with the centennial of the Civil War. A similar series with the same artwork was later issued in Canada, and A&BC produced a similar set in England. The cards were issued five to a wax pack, and were accompanied by facsimiles of paper currency of the Confederate States of America. The original selling price was a nickel per package. Topps later issued the cards in cellophane-wrapped strips ("cello packs").

Note: Since 1989 a monthly newspaper titled Civil War News has been published by Historical Publications, Inc. in Tunbridge, Vermont. See web site.

Read more about Civil War NewsChecklist of Confederate Currency

Famous quotes containing the words civil war, news, civil and/or war:

    At Hayes’ General Store, west of the cemetery, hangs an old army rifle, used by a discouraged Civil War veteran to end his earthly troubles. The grocer took the rifle as payment ‘on account.’
    —Administration for the State of Con, U.S. public relief program (1935-1943)

    The nature of bad news infects the teller.
    William Shakespeare (1564–1616)

    The principle of majority rule is the mildest form in which the force of numbers can be exercised. It is a pacific substitute for civil war in which the opposing armies are counted and the victory is awarded to the larger before any blood is shed. Except in the sacred tests of democracy and in the incantations of the orators, we hardly take the trouble to pretend that the rule of the majority is not at bottom a rule of force.
    Walter Lippmann (1889–1974)

    Newspaperman: That was a magnificent work. There were these mass columns of Apaches in their war paint and feather bonnets. And here was Thursday leading his men in that heroic charge.
    Capt. York: Correct in every detail.
    Newspaperman: He’s become almost a legend already. He’s the hero of every schoolboy in America.
    Frank S. Nugent (1908–1965)