Civil Rights - Protection of Rights

Protection of Rights

T.H. Marshall Notes that civil rights were among the first to be recognized and codified, followed later by political rights and still later by social rights. In many countries, they are constitutional rights and are included in a bill of rights or similar document. They are also defined in international human rights instruments, such as the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the 1967 International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights.

Civil and political rights need not be codified to be protected, although most democracies worldwide do have formal written guarantees of civil and political rights. Civil rights are considered to be natural rights. Thomas Jefferson wrote in his A Summary View of the Rights of British America that "a free people their rights as derived from the laws of nature, and not as the gift of their chief magistrate."

The question of to whom civil and political rights apply is a subject of controversy. In many countries, citizens have greater protections against infringement of rights than non-citizens; at the same time, civil and political rights are considered to be universal rights that apply to all persons.

Read more about this topic:  Civil Rights

Other articles related to "protection of rights, of rights":

Constitution Of Australia - Interpretation - Protection of Rights
... See also Australian constitutional law – Protection of rights The Australian Constitution does not include a Bill of Rights ... delegates to the 1898 Constitutional Convention favoured a section similar to the Bill of Rights of the United States Constitution, but the majority felt that the ... Australian Constitution has often been criticised for its scant protection of rights and freedoms ...

Famous quotes containing the words protection of, rights and/or protection:

    No: until I want the protection of Massachusetts to be extended to me in some distant Southern port, where my liberty is endangered, or until I am bent solely on building up an estate at home by peaceful enterprise, I can afford to refuse allegiance to Massachusetts, and her right to my property and life. It costs me less in every sense to incur the penalty of disobedience to the State than it would to obey. I should feel as if I were worth less in that case.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    The demand for equal rights in every vocation of life is just and fair; but, after all, the most vital right is the right to love and be loved.
    Emma Goldman (1869–1940)

    Freedom of religion, freedom of the press, and freedom of person under the protection of habeas corpus, and trial by juries impartially selected. These principles form the bright constellation which has gone before us, and guided our steps through an age of revolution and reformation.
    Thomas Jefferson (1743–1826)