Citizens

Some articles on citizens:

Pnyx - Athenian Democracy
... Scholars such as Mogens Herman Hansen suggest the pnyx was able to hold about 6,000 citizens, though later expansions may have accommodated 8,000 or as many as 13,000 ... states that the Pnyx had enough standing room for as many as 20,000 citizens ... can be taken as a reasonable estimate of the number of politically active citizens (citizens were free males born in the city, or perhaps 20% of the adult population) ...
Volontaire Civil à L'Aide Technique
... in the French overseas territories for citizens from France, citizens of other EU member states or citizens of countries belonging to the European Economic Area ...
United States V. Schwimmer - Court Decision - Quotes From The Majority Opinion By Justice Butler
... regulating who can become naturalized citizens because of the benefits it brings ... to being able to compel military service of its citizens if necessary ... of vital importance, for if all or a large number of citizens oppose such defense the 'good order and happiness' of the United States cannot long endure.” The pacifism that ...
Henry Ian Cusick - Filmography - Theatre
... Theatre (preview, Edinburgh International Festival), Glasgow Citizens Theatre Cassio in Othello - Royal Shakespeare Company Demetrius in A Midsummer Night's Dream - RSC ...
Helsinki Citizens’ Assembly
... The Helsinki Citizens’ Assembly (hCa) is an organization of citizens dedicated to peace, democracy and human rights in Europe ... this created gave rise to a new peace movement called the “Helsinki Citizens’ Assembly” ... It means the creation of new social relationships, new forms of dialogue, through which citizens can negotiate with governments and each other, put pressure on ...

Famous quotes containing the word citizens:

    Do you know what Agelisas said, when he was asked why the great city of Lacedomonie was not girded with walls? Because, pointing out the inhabitants and citizens of the city, so expert in military discipline and so strong and well armed: “Here,” he said, “are the walls of the city,” meaning that there is no wall but of bones, and that towns and cities can have no more secure nor stronger wall than the virtue of their citizens and inhabitants.
    François Rabelais (1494–1553)

    It was the most ungrateful and unjust act ever perpetrated by a republic upon a class of citizens who had worked and sacrificed and suffered as did the women of this nation in the struggle of the Civil War only to be rewarded at its close by such unspeakable degradation as to be reduced to the plane of subjects to enfranchised slaves.
    Anna Howard Shaw (1847–1919)

    ... the Wall became a magnet for citizens of every generation, class, race, and relationship to the war perhaps because it is the only great public monument that allows the anesthetized holes in the heart to fill with a truly national grief.
    Adrienne Rich (b. 1929)