Cichlasoma Urophthalmus

Cichlasoma Urophthalmus

The Mayan cichlid (Cichlasoma urophthalmus) is a member of the Cichlidae family of fish. It is also known as the mojarra castarrica in its native Mexico. It has interesting colors, with its eight black bands (starting just behind the eye) and its large ocellus (eyespot) on the caudal peduncle (base of the tail), which gives it its scientific name. It has a base color of brown to red that becomes more intense during breeding. As in many animals, the red color is much more brilliant in wild specimens than captive ones, but one can help maintain some of its vibrance by feeding the fish live foods and foods that contain Vitamin A, which breaks down into the red pigment beta-carotene in the body. Previously, this species was a member of the genus Cichlasoma and the subgeneric section Nandopsis. However, the genus Cichlasoma is in revision and has been restricted to the 12 species of South American cichlids related to Cichlasoma bimaculatum. Thus, many of the approximately 100 species that were formerly members of Cichlasoma have yet to be formally assigned to a new genus, and are conventionally referred to as "Cichlasoma" for the time being, with the subgeneric section tentatively intended as the new genus. Thus, the Mayan cichlid is identified here as both Cichlasoma uropthalmus and Cichlasoma (Nandopsis) urophthalmus in accord with the convention for taxonomically undetermined cichlids (Kullander 1983, Stiassny 1991).

Read more about Cichlasoma Urophthalmus:  Range and Habitat, Reproduction

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Cichlasoma Urophthalmus - Aquarium Husbandry - Breeding
... As in most substrate-spawning cichlids, the adults are excellent parents, mouthing the eggs to keep them free of fungi, and then caring for the babies diligently ... The young can be reared in much the same way as those of other substrate spawners ...