Christina Onassis - Early Life

Early Life

Born in New York City, Onassis lost her entire immediate family within a period of 29 months. Her brother Alexander died in a plane crash in 1973 and her mother died of drug overdose in 1974. Her father's health had started to deteriorate after Alexander's death and he died in 1975. Alexander was the focus of her father's attention as his successor until his death, after which her father considered her his successor and began training her in the business operations of the Onassis business empire. She became very involved in the business operations of the Onassis shipping empire and successfully ran the business after her father's death.

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