Chittagong Hill Tracts Conflict

The Chittagong Hill Tracts Conflict was the political conflict and armed struggle between the Government of Bangladesh by the Parbatya Chattagram Jana Sanghati Samiti (United People's Party of the Chittagong Hill Tracts) and its armed wing, the Shanti Bahini over the issue of autonomy and the rights of the indigenous peoples and tribes of the Chittagong Hill Tracts. The Shanti Bahini launched an insurgency against government forces in 1977, and the conflict continued for twenty years until the government and the PCJSS signed the Chittagong Hill Tracts Peace Accord in 1997.

Read more about Chittagong Hill Tracts ConflictBackground, Insurgency, Government Reaction, Peace Accord, Aftermath

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Chittagong Hill Tracts Conflict - Aftermath
... the 1997 peace accord has ensured a pause on long-standing self-determination armed conflict ... existing problems and the elimination of the causes of potential conflict ...

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