China Agricultural University - China Agricultural University Library

China Agricultural University Library

China Agricultural University Library consists of two parts, east library (No.17 Qinghua Dong Lu) and west library (No.2 Yuanmingyuan Xi Lu) occupying 21,665 square meters and hosting 2774 reading seats. China Agricultural University Library (CAUL) is one of the most important libraries in agricultural education and research in China. The collections include both paper documents numbering more than 1.7 million volumes and over 1.47 million electronic documents. The collections emphasize agricultural science, biology and agricultural engineering. 116 library staff work in the library including 39 research librarians and associate research librarians. 29 library staff are post-graduates. CAUL also functions as National Agricultural Information Center of CALIS (China Academic Library & Information System) and National Foreign Textbook Center in Agriculture. Haidian District Agriculture Library is affiliated with the China Agricultural University Library. CAUL established an automatic information service system in 1995. This now runs efficiently and successfully. User education is one of the main functions of CAUL. The library provides different kinds of training courses and workshops to students and faculty every year. CAUL has been actively developing international communication and cooperation. CAUL will pursue collection development, personalized information services and resources sharing.

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