Children

Some articles on children:

Classifications - Yūrei
... Ubume A mother ghost who died in childbirth, or died leaving young children behind ... This yūrei returns to care for her children, often bringing them sweets ... Zashiki-warashi The ghosts of children, often mischievous rather than dangerous ...
Marriage - Sex and Procreation
... Historically, and still in many countries, children born outside of marriage suffered severe social stigma and discrimination ... In England and Wales, such children were known as bastards and whoresons ... Children born outside marriage have become more common, and in some countries, the majority ...
Wug Test - Description
... There are two...?" Children who have successfully acquired the allomorph /z/ of the plural morpheme will respond wugs /wʌɡz/ ... Very young children are baffled by the question and are unable to answer correctly, sometimes responding with "Two wug." Preschoolers aged 4 to 5 test best in dealing with /z/ after a voiced ... Children in the first year of primary school were almost fully competent with both /s/ and /z/ ...
Proverb - Use in Conversation
... Proverbs are used in conversation by adults more than children, partially because adults have learned more proverbs than children ... Additionally, children have not mastered the patterns of metaphorical expression that are invoked in proverb use ...
Orbona
... Orbona was the goddess who granted new children to parents who had become childless ... She was also the goddess of children, especially orphans ... upon as a general guardian and tutelary deity of children and orphans ...

Famous quotes containing the word children:

    For children preserve the fame of a man after his death.
    Aeschylus (525–456 B.C.)

    Mothers who have little sense of their own minds and voices are unable to imagine such capacities in their children. Not being fully aware of the power of words for communicating meaning, they expect their children to know what is on their minds without the benefit of words. These parents do not tell their children what they mean by “good” much less why. Nor do they ask the children to explain themselves.
    Mary Field Belenky (20th century)

    What will our children remember of us, ten, fifteen years from now? The mobile we bought or didn’t buy? Or the tone in our voices, the look in our eyes, the enthusiasm for life—and for them—that we felt? They, and we, will remember the spirit of things, not the letter. Those memories will go so deep that no one could measure it, capture it, bronze it, or put it in a scrapbook.
    Sonia Taitz (20th century)