Charles Richard Drew

Some articles on richard, charles richard drew, drew:

Anne Neville - Death
... she died, there was an eclipse, which some took to be an omen of Richard's fall from heavenly grace ... Richard is said to have wept at her funeral ... Nevertheless, rumours circulated that Richard had poisoned her in order to marry his niece Elizabeth of York ...
Henry Stafford, 2nd Duke Of Buckingham - Accession of Richard III
... declared Edward V illegitimate, offering Richard the throne, and he accepted it, becoming Richard III ... Buckingham moved quickly to support Richard's claim ... He was with Richard when they took possession of the young King Edward V at Stony Stratford in April 1483, and he played a major role in the coup d'etat which followed ...
Richard, 1st Earl Of Cornwall - Marriages and Issue
... Richard of Cornwall married firstly, on 30 March 1231 at Fawley, Buckinghamshire, Isabel Marshal, widow of Gilbert de Clare, 5th Earl of Gloucester, and daughter of William Marshal ... shortly before November 1312), daughter of Richard de Clare, Earl of Gloucester, by his second wife, Maud de Lacy, daughter of John de Lacy, 2nd Earl of Lincoln ... By an unknown mistress or mistresses, Richard of Cornwall had several illegitimate children, including three sons and a daughter Philip of Cornwall, a priest ...
Anne Neville
11 June 1456 – 16 March 1485) was an English noblewoman, the daughter of Richard Neville, 16th Earl of Warwick (the "Kingmaker"), who became Princess ... Her father Warwick betrothed her as a girl to Richard, youngest brother of King Edward IV of York, then later arranged her marriage to Edward, the ... After the deaths of Edward and Warwick, she married Richard ...
Charles Richard Drew House
... Charles Richard Drew House was a home of Afro-American doctor Charles Richard Drew, whose leadership on stockpiling of blood plasma saved lives during World War II ... Drew from 1920 to 1939 ... was expanded with a two-room two-story addition during Drew's ownership ...

Famous quotes containing the word drew:

    We read poetry because the poets, like ourselves, have been haunted by the inescapable tyranny of time and death; have suffered the pain of loss, and the more wearing, continuous pain of frustration and failure; and have had moods of unlooked-for release and peace. They have known and watched in themselves and others.
    —Elizabeth Drew (1887–1965)