Character

Character

Character(s) may refer to:

Read more about Character:  Art and Entertainment, Symbols, Mathematics, Other, Personality

Other articles related to "characters, character":

Judge Dredd - Publication History
... developing 2000 AD in 1976, he brought in his former writing partner, John Wagner, to develop characters ... various Dirty Harry-style "tough cop" stories for other titles, and suggested a character who took that concept to its logical extreme, imagining an ultra-violent law-enforcement officer ... The task of visualising the character was given to Carlos Ezquerra, a Spanish artist who had worked for Mills before on Battle Picture Weekly ...
Ollie - Fictional Characters
... show Kukla, Fran and Ollie Ollie Williams, a minor character on Family Guy Ollie, a minor character on Nick Jr's The Wonder Pets Ollie Fliptrik, the main character in an ...
X (The X-Files)
... X, is a fictional character on the American science fiction television series The X-Files ... The character serves as a replacement for Deep Throat, who had been killed off in the first season finale, "The Erlenmeyer Flask" ... second season episode "The Host", although the character would not appear on-screen until "Sleepless", two episodes later ...
Character - Personality
... Character structure, a person's traits Moral character, an evaluation of a particular individual's durable moral qualities ...

Famous quotes containing the word character:

    Eccentricity: strength of character doubling back on itself.
    Mason Cooley (b. 1927)

    We have good reason to believe that memories of early childhood do not persist in consciousness because of the absence or fragmentary character of language covering this period. Words serve as fixatives for mental images. . . . Even at the end of the second year of life when word tags exist for a number of objects in the child’s life, these words are discrete and do not yet bind together the parts of an experience or organize them in a way that can produce a coherent memory.
    Selma H. Fraiberg (20th century)

    Common-sense appears to be only another name for the thoughtlessness of the unthinking. It is made of the prejudices of childhood, the idiosyncrasies of individual character and the opinion of the newspapers.
    W. Somerset Maugham (1874–1966)