Character

Character

Character(s) may refer to:

Read more about Character:  Art and Entertainment, Symbols, Mathematics, Other, Personality

Other articles related to "characters, character":

Judge Dredd - Publication History
... former writing partner, John Wagner, to develop characters ... tough cop" stories for other titles, and suggested a character who took that concept to its logical extreme, imagining an ultra-violent law-enforcement officer patrolling a future New York ... The task of visualising the character was given to Carlos Ezquerra, a Spanish artist who had worked for Mills before on Battle Picture Weekly ...
X (The X-Files)
... X, is a fictional character on the American science fiction television series The X-Files ... The character serves as a replacement for Deep Throat, who had been killed off in the first season finale, "The Erlenmeyer Flask" ... Steven Williams, and made his d├ębut in the second season episode "The Host", although the character would not appear on-screen until "Sleepless", two episodes later ...
Character - Personality
... Character structure, a person's traits Moral character, an evaluation of a particular individual's durable moral qualities ...
Ollie - Fictional Characters
... on the television show Kukla, Fran and Ollie Ollie Williams, a minor character on Family Guy Ollie, a minor character on Nick Jr's The Wonder Pets Ollie Fliptrik, the main character in an eponymous ...

Famous quotes containing the word character:

    Pity the man who has a character to support—it is worse than a large family—he is silent poor indeed.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    The truth and regularity of a character is not, in justice, to be looked upon as broken, from any one single act or omission which may seem a contradiction to it:Mthe best of men appear sometimes to be strange compounds of contradictory qualities.
    Laurence Sterne (1713–1768)

    Play builds the kind of free-and-easy, try-it-out, do-it-yourself character that our future needs. We must become more self-conscious and more explicit in our praise and reinforcement as children use unstructured play materials: “That’s good. You use your own ideas....” “That’s good. You did it your way....” “That’s good. You thought it all out yourself.”
    James L. Hymes, Jr. (20th century)