Chaos Theory in Organizational Development

Chaos theory in organizational development refers to a subset of chaos theory which incorporates principles of quantum mechanics and presents them in a complex systems environment. To the observer the systems seem to be in chaos. Organizational Development of a business system is the management of that apparent chaos. The term “Managing Organized Chaos” is used in the book by the same name Managing Organized Chaos – Business Planning 1.0, to describe the daily management of an entity (business) engaged in continual activity.

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Chaos Theory In Organizational Development - Applications and Pitfalls
... The primary goal of an organizational development (OD) consultant is to initiate, facilitate, and support successful change in an organization ... Using chaos theory as the sole model for change may be far too risky for any stakeholder buy-in ... The concept of uncertainty on which chaos theory relies is not an appealing motive for change compared to many alternative "safer" models of ...

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