Ceremonial Clothing in Western Cultures

Ceremonial clothing in Western cultures, life cycle celebrations associated with particular occasions are manifested by certain types of ceremonial clothing. Some events where ceremonial clothing would be worn include baptism, graduation, marriage, and mourning.

Read more about Ceremonial Clothing In Western Cultures:  Birth, Leaving Nursery Status, Reaching Adult Status, Graduation, Marriage, Death

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Ceremonial Clothing In Western Cultures - Death
... Anyone attending the funeral is expected to wear black or at least sombre or drab-colored clothing ... Following the funeral, family and friends now resume their normal clothing ... and time for a course of mourning that started with black clothing, progressed to grey, then violet, and ended with the wearing of colors again ...

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