Central Woodward Christian Church

Central Woodward Christian Church is a Metro-Detroit congregation affiliated with the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ). Located in Troy, Michigan, this historic congregation was originally located in Detroit on Woodward Avenue. After the congregation decided to relocate, its historic neo-Gothic building, built in 1928, was sold to the Little Rock Missionary Baptist Church is a church in Detroit Michigan located at 9000 Woodward Avenue. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1982 and designated a Michigan State Historic Site in 1993.

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Central Woodward Christian Church - Building
... The church is built in a classic Gothic style from Indiana limestone, and has a slate roof, copper trim, and stained glass windows ... Allen, the founder of the African-Methodist-Episcopal church, Dr ...

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