Causes of World War I

The causes of World War I, which began in central Europe in late July 1914, included intertwined factors, such as the conflicts and hostility of the four decades leading up to the war. Militarism, alliances, imperialism, and nationalism played major roles in the conflict as well. The immediate origins of the war, however, lay in the decisions taken by statesmen and dictators during the Crisis of 1914, casus belli for which was the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria and his wife by Gavrilo Princip, an irredentist Serb.

The phenomenen came after a short and easy series of diplomatic clashes between the Great Powers (Italy, France, Germany, the British Empire, the Austro-Hungarian Empire and Russia) over European and colonial issues in the decade before 1914 that had left tensions high. In turn these diplomatic clashes can be traced to changes in the balance of power in Europe since 1867. The more immediate cause for the war was tensions over territory in the Balkans. Austria-Hungary competed with Serbia and Russia for territory and influence in the region and they pulled the rest of the Great Powers into the conflict through their various alliances and treaties.

The topic of the causes of World War I is one of the most studied in all of world history. Scholars have differed significantly in their interpretations of the event.

Read more about Causes Of World War I:  Background, Overview, Historiography

Other articles related to "causes of world war i, war, world":

Causes Of World War I - Historiography
... Anglo-American historians argued that Germany was solely responsible for the start of the war ... academic work in the English-speaking world in the later 1920s and 1930s blamed participants more equally ... "The Berlin War Party," although some historians have argued for shared guilt or pointed to the Entente ...

Famous quotes containing the words war and/or world:

    Against war one might say that it makes the victor stupid and the vanquished malicious. In its favor, that in producing these two effects it barbarizes, and so makes the combatants more natural. For culture it is a sleep or a wintertime, and man emerges from it stronger for good and for evil.
    Friedrich Nietzsche (1844–1900)

    Novelists are perhaps the last people in the world to be entrusted with opinions. The nature of a novel is that it has no opinions, only the dialectic of contrary views, some of which, all of which, may be untenable and even silly. A novelist should not be too intelligent either, although ... he may be permitted to be an intellectual.
    Anthony Burgess (b. 1917)