Camborne School of Mines

The Camborne School of Mines (in Cornish, Scoll Balow Cambron), commonly abbreviated to CSM, was founded in 1888. It is now a specialist department of the University of Exeter. Its research and teaching is related to the understanding and management of the Earth's natural processes, resources and the environment. It has undergraduate, postgraduate and research degree programmes within the Earth resources, civil engineering, environmental and energy sectors. CSM hosts the Cornwall campus of the University of Exeter at Tremough, Cornwall and is part of the School of Engineering, Maths and Physics.

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Other articles related to "camborne school of mines, school, camborne, school of mines":

Mining In Cornwall - Study and Education - Camborne School of Mines
... metal mining to the Cornish economy, the Camborne School of Mines (CSM) developed as the only specialist hard rock education establishment in the ... Despite this move, the students and School continue with the use of "Camborne" in the title ...
History - Mining - Camborne School of Mines
... Because of the importance of metal mining to the Cornish economy, the Camborne School of Mines (CSM) developed as the only specialist hard rock education establishment in the United Kingdom, until the ... Its beginnings can be traced to 1829 when plans for the school were first laid out and leading to the current school in 1888 ...
Camborne School Of Mines - Social Life
... Sport within the school is strong and there are team sports run under the CSM name in local leagues but are open to any students at Tremough ... A key event in the school's sporting calendar is the annual Bottle match against Royal School of Mines which is organised by the student association ...

Famous quotes containing the words mines and/or school:

    The humblest observer who goes to the mines sees and says that gold-digging is of the character of a lottery; the gold thus obtained is not the same thing with the wages of honest toil. But, practically, he forgets what he has seen, for he has seen only the fact, not the principle, and goes into trade there, that is, buys a ticket in what commonly proves another lottery, where the fact is not so obvious.
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