Bulgarian Language - Relationship To Macedonian

Relationship To Macedonian

Until the period immediately following the Second World War, all Bulgarian and the majority of foreign linguists referred to the South Slavic dialect continuum spanning the area of modern Bulgaria, the Republic of Macedonia and parts of Northern Greece as a group of Bulgarian dialects. In contrast, Serbian sources tended to label them "south Serbian" dialects. Some local naming conventions included bolgarski, bugarski and so forth. The codifiers of the standard Bulgarian language, however, did not wish to make any allowances for a pluricentric "Bulgaro-Macedonian" compromise. After 1944 Communist Bulgaria and Communist Yugoslavia began a policy of making Macedonia into the connecting link for the establishment of new Balkan Federative Republic and stimulating here a development of distinct Slav Macedonian consciousness. With the proclamation of the Socialist Republic of Macedonia as part of the Yugoslav federation, the new authorities also started measures that would overcome the pro-Bulgarian feeling among parts of its population and in 1945 a separate Macedonian language was codified. After 1958, when the pressure from Moscow decreased, Sofia reverted to the view that the Macedonian language did not exist as a separate language. Nowadays, some linguists still consider Macedonian dialects as Bulgarian. The current academic consensus (outside of Bulgaria) is that Macedonian is an autonomous language within the South Slavic dialect continuum.

Read more about this topic:  Bulgarian Language

Other articles related to "relationship to macedonian, macedonian":

Bulgarski - Relationship To Macedonian
... however, did not wish to make any allowances for a pluricentric "Bulgaro-Macedonian" compromise ... Republic and stimulating here a development of distinct Slav Macedonian consciousness ... the pro-Bulgarian feeling among parts of its population and in 1945 a separate Macedonian language was codified ...

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