Bulgarian Language - Common Expressions

Common Expressions

  • Здравей (zdravéy) – Hello
  • Здрасти (zdrásti) – Hi
  • Добро утро (dobró útro) – Good morning
  • Добър ден (dóbər dén) – Good day
  • Добър вечер (dóbər vécher) – Good evening
  • Лека нощ (léka nósht) – Good night
  • Довиждане (dovízhdane) – Good-bye
  • Как се казваш? (kak se kazvash) – What is your name (informal)?
  • Кой си ти? (kóy si ti) – Who are you?
  • Коя си ти? (kоyá si ti) – Who are you?
  • Кой сте вие? (kóy ste víe)
  • Коя сте вие? (kоyá ste víe) – Who are you?

(In the above two examples, the formal expression uses a plural verb but a singular pronoun, which allows speakers to distinguish the two grammatical forms.)

  • Кои сте вие? (kоí ste víe) – Who are you?
  • Как си? (kák si) – How are you?
  • Как сте? (kák sté) – How are you?
  • Да (dá) – Yes
  • Не (né) – No
  • Може би (mózhe bí) – Maybe
  • Какво правиш? (kakvó právish) – What are you doing?
  • Какво правите? (kakvó právite) – What are you doing?
  • Добре съм (dobré səm) – I’m fine
  • Всичко хубаво (vsíchko húbavo) – All the best
  • Поздрави (pózdravi) – Regards
  • Благодаря (blagodaryə́) – Thank you
  • Моля (mólya) – Please
  • Моля (mólia) – You're welcome
  • Извинете! (izvinéte) – Excuse me!
  • Извинявай! (izvinyávai) – Sorry!
  • Обичам те! (obícham te) – I love you!
  • Колко е часът? (kólko e chasə́t) – What’s the time?
  • Говорите ли…? (govórite li…) – Do you speak…?
…английски (anglíyski) – English
…български (bə́lgarski) – Bulgarian
…немски (némski) – German
…полски (polski) – Polish
…руски (ruski) – Russian
…холандски (holándski) – Dutch
…гръцки (grə́tski) – Greek
…сръбски (srə́bski) – Serbian
…италиански (italiánski) – Italian
…испански (ispánski) – Spanish
…френски (frénski) – French
…японски (yapónski) – Japanese
…китайски (kitáyski) – Chinese
…корейски (koréyski) – Korean
…арабски (arabski) – Arabic
  • Ще се видим скоро (shté sé vídim skóro) – We'll see each other soon
  • Ще се видим утре (shté sé vídim útre) – We'll see each other tomorrow

Also, some very frequent expressions have been borrowed from other languages. Most of them are somewhat informal.

  • Мерси (mersí) – Thank you; from French (although this word is probably even more common than native "Благодаря", it is inappropriate in very official or solemn contexts)
  • Чао (cháo) – Bye; from Italian (the informal counterpart of native "Довиждане", this word is more common than the native)
  • Cупep (súper) – Super; (from English, colloquial; note – "Super" remains the same regardless of quantity or gender, although an even more colloquial adjective суперски (súperski) does decline as usual)
  • Aло (álo) – Hello on the phone; from French (unlike the above, this word is stylistically neutral).
  • Здраве да е! (zdràve da e) – lit. "may there (at least) be health" (used when things have not gone as well as the speaker might have hoped.)

Read more about this topic:  Bulgarian Language

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