Buddhist Mythology - Yidam

Yidam

The Yidam, or Ishta-devata, is a personal meditation deity. The Sanskrit word iṣṭadevatā or iṣṭadevaḥ is defined by V. S. Apte as "a favorite god, one's tutelary deity." Though this term is used in many popular books on Buddhist Tantra, the term işţadevatā has not been attested in any Buddhist tantric text in Sanskrit. The unrelated Tibetan version of the term, possibly of entirely native origin, is yi-dam is said to be a contraction of Tib. yid-kyi-dam-tshig, meaning "samaya of mind"- in other words, the state of being indestructibly bonded with the inherently pure and liberated nature of mind.

The Ishta-devata of Hinduism is an aspect of God for personal worship. In Buddhism, a Yidam is a manifestation of enlightenment and make take the form of Sambhogakāya Buddhas, tantric deities, bodhisattvas, Dharma protectors or other historical figures.

Read more about this topic:  Buddhist Mythology

Other articles related to "yidam":

Three Roots - The Individual 'roots' - Yidam
... The second root is the meditational deity or yidam ... The iconography of the yidam may be 'peaceful', 'wrathful' (Tibetan tro wa) or 'neither peaceful or wrathful'(Tibetan shi ma tro), depending on the practitioner ... The yidam represents awakening, so its appearance reflects whatever is required by the practitioner to awaken ...
Three Roots
... Tibetan Buddhist tradition are the lama (Sanskrit guru), yidam (Sanskrit ishtadevata) and protector, which may be a khandroma (Sanskrit dakini) or ... the Yidam is the 'root of methods' or 'root of accomplishments' the Khandroma or Chokyong is the 'root of protection' or 'root of activity' In the Yangzab compilation of Dzogchen ... are Guru Rinpoche (the guru), Hayagriva (the yidam), and Vajravarahi (the dakini) ...
Tara (Buddhism) - Sadhanas of Tārā
... Sadhanas in which Tārā is the yidam (meditational deity) can be extensive or quite brief ... this case during the creation phase of Tārā as a yidam, she is seen as having as much reality as any other phenomena apprehended through the mind ... of the visualization of oneself as the yidam and also the emptiness of one's ordinary self ...
Three Roots - Correspondences
... as the Three Roots the Guru (or Teacher), who is the root of blessings the Yidam, who is the root of accomplishment and the Dakini, who is the root of enlightened activity ... The Guru is the Budha, the Yidam is the Dharma, and the Dakinis and Protectors are the Sangha ... Inner or 'Three Roots' Lama (Guru) Yidam (Ista-devata) Khandroma (Dakini) ultimate or 'Trikaya' Dharmakaya Sambhogakaya Nirmanakaya Three Vajras Mind Speech Body ...
Tara (Buddhism) - Tārā As A Tantric Deity
... usually present Tārā as a tutelary deity (thug dam, yidam) which the practitioners sees as being a latent aspect of one's mind, or a manifestation in a visible form of a ... As John Blofeld puts it in The Tantric Mysticism of Tibet The function of the Yidam is one of the profound mysteries of the Vajrayana...Especially during ... Yidam is the Tibetan rendering of the Sanskrit word "Istadeva"—the in-dwelling deity but, where the Hindus take the Istadeva for an actual deity who has been invited to dwell in the devotee's ...