Bucher's Mill Covered Bridge

The Bucher's Mill Covered Bridge or Butcher's Mill Covered Bridge is a covered bridge that spans Cocalico Creek in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, United States. After the Landis Mill Covered Bridge, it is the second shortest covered bridge in the county. A county-owned and maintained bridge, its official designation is the Cocalico #2 Bridge.

The bridge has a single span, wooden, double Burr arch trusses design with the addition of steel hanger rods. The deck is made from oak planks. It is painted red, the traditional color of Lancaster County covered bridges, on both the inside and outside. Both approaches to the bridge are painted in the traditional white color.

The bridge's WGCB Number is 38-36-12. In 1980 it was added to the National Register of Historic Places as structure number 80003514. It is located at 40°12′28.2″N 76°8′4.8″W / 40.207833°N 76.134667°W / 40.207833; -76.134667 (40.20783, -76.134667) to the northeast of Ephrata, Pennsylvania off Pennsylvania Route 272 on Cocalico Creek Road.

Read more about Bucher's Mill Covered Bridge:  History

Famous quotes containing the words bridge, covered and/or mill:

    Like a bridge over troubled water
    I will lay me down.
    Paul Simon (b. 1949)

    The knowledge of an unlearned man is living and luxuriant like a forest, but covered with mosses and lichens and for the most part inaccessible and going to waste; the knowledge of the man of science is like timber collected in yards for public works, which still supports a green sprout here and there, but even this is liable to dry rot.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    War is an ugly thing, but not the ugliest of things: the decayed and degraded state of moral and patriotic feeling which thinks nothing worth a war, is worse.... A war to protect other human beings against tyrannical injustice; a war to give victory to their own ideas of right and good, and which is their own war, carried on for an honest purpose by their own free choice—is often the means of their regeneration.
    —John Stuart Mill (1806–1873)