Brother George

Some articles on george, brother george, brother, brothers:

John Augustine Hartford
... His father, George Huntington Hartford (1832–1917) left the control of the company's voting stock to a trust that gave total control to John and his older brother George Ludlum Hartford (1864–1957) who ... operations side of the empire, while his brother George ran the financial side ... Time Magazine interviewed John and his brother George who were on their cover in November 1950 ...
Edwin Gould I
... George Jay Gould I, brother Helen Gould, sister Anna Gould, sister Frank Jay Gould, brother Edwin Gould (February 26, 1866 – July 12, 1933), was an ... His brothers and sisters, save for Helen, all insisted on marrying actresses or noblemen —generally more than once ... His brother Howard (now living abroad) married Actress Viola Kathrine Clemmons and separated from her ...
Isaac Robert Cruikshank
... portrait miniaturist, the less well-known brother of George Cruikshank, both sons of Isaac Cruikshank ... Born in Middlesex, where he and his brother George attended school in Edgware ... Both brothers were interested in the theatre, and performed in dramas they had written themselves with their friend Edmund Kean ...
Richard Whitney (financier) - Biography
... He was born on August 1, 1888 in Boston, Massachusetts to George Whitney, Sr ... Richard Whitney's father, George Whitney, Sr ... of North National Union Bank, and educated Richard and his older brother George Whitney, Jr ...
John Augustine Hartford - Biography
... John Hartford was born in Orange, New Jersey and was the fourth child of George Huntington Hartford (1832–1917) and Marie Josephine Ludium (1837–1915) ... John's older brother, known as Mr ... George to distinguish him from his father known as Mr ...

Famous quotes containing the word brother:

    I was interested to see how a pioneer lived on this side of the country. His life is in some respects more adventurous than that of his brother in the West; for he contends with winter as well as the wilderness, and there is a greater interval of time at least between him and the army which is to follow. Here immigration is a tide which may ebb when it has swept away the pines; there it is not a tide, but an inundation, and roads and other improvements come steadily rushing after.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)