British Commando Frogmen

Britain's commando frogman force is now the Special Boat Service (SBS), which is part of the Royal Marines. They perform various operations on land as well as in the water. Until the late 1990s, all members of the Special Air Service (SAS) Boat Troops were trained as commando frogmen.

Other articles related to "commando, british commando frogmen, british":

Lebanese Commando Regiment - Selection and Training
... A commando soldier candidate is selected based on a sports test, a general information test, and a medical test ... intends to prepare the candidates to follow a commando course for two months at the Special Forces School, after which graduates follow the companies of the commando regiment, and follow additional ...
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... The North Vietnamese produced some of the most effective commando units of the post World War II era ... attacks increasingly untenable, small commando operations came into their own, particularly after the Tet Offensive, and at times inflicted severe ...
British Commando Frogmen - History - 1945 and After
... The British Chariots were used in the immediate post war period to clear mines and wrecks in harbours ... By the end of the war, the British human torpedo operations had earned their participants 20 medals and 16 men had been killed ...
Lebanese Commando Regiment - Foundation
... the decision and called after Captain Abou-Dargham who was ordered to start establishing a commando unit ... to conduct the training, among them Colonel Commando Makhoul Hakmé and Colonel Commando Nabih Farhat who followed commando courses at the Saika school in Egypt ... The first commando course lasted for two months, and the result came up shockingly short to the LAF command ...
Swiss Raid Commando
... The Swiss Raid Commando was one of the most enduring and most important military competitions worldwide ... trained, armed force personnel, who were willing to compete in a "commando" type exercise ...

Famous quotes containing the word british:

    We know no spectacle so ridiculous as the British public in one of its periodical fits of morality.
    Thomas Babington Macaulay (1800–1859)