British Cattle Movement Service

The British Cattle Movement Service (BCMS) is the organisation responsible for maintaining a database of all bovine animals in the United Kingdom, except for Northern Ireland, which has a separate database maintained by the Department of Agriculture and Rural Development. It was established in the wake of the Bovine spongiform encephalopathy crisis in the UK, and is part of the Rural Payments Agency. Other member states of the European Union have similar cattle tracing systems.

Every bovine animal in the United Kingdom (as elsewhere in the European Union) has a unique number, shown both on an ear tag in each ear and on a paper cattle passport which is held by the current keeper of the animal (the system covers both cattle and other bovine animals such as water buffalo and bison). The number and passport remain with the animal throughout its life, and is recorded by the slaughterhouse at its death, allowing traceability of the beef. The BCMS central database is called the Cattle Tracing System, and works alongside the physical passport to record the births, deaths and movements of all cattle.

Read more about British Cattle Movement Service:  Cattle Tracing System, Cattle Passport, Ear Tag Number

Other articles related to "british cattle movement service, cattle, british":

British Cattle Movement Service - Ear Tag Number
... Each tag must have the cattle passport number printed or stamped upon it, and it may also have a RFID chip bearing the same number in electronic form ... The British ear tag and passport number is in the format UK HHHHHH CNNNNN – this has been in use since 2002, before which other formats were used ... herd (usually one herd per farm, or sometimes one for each cattle enterprise on a farm) C – a check digit (cycling from 1 to 7 the check digit for the first calf varies from herd to herd) N – a sequential five-figu ...

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